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20121201
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Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
allowed to see. for awhile top level u.s. policymakers approved torturing people. and americans did torture people based on policy advise that it was legal for them to do so. but the current president put a stop to that right when he took office. we don't do that anymore. some things we stop doing. some things that we were told, yeah, maybe this is unprecedented, maybe this sunt seem like the thing america does, but we have to do that. some of those things from the past decade are things that we have stopped doing. that said, some of the things we still are doing are still pretty hard to get your head around. we're still fighting the longest war in u.s. history and still has two-plus years on the clock. it's the longest war in u.s. history and we were fighting it at the same time as another one of the longest wars in u.s. history. . if you told anybody in advance of that plan that that's how our country would spend the first decade plus of the 21st century, you would have been laughed at. before we started doing it, you could not have convinced anyone that after we closed our secret
one is a commuter. he is part-time. he also has another job being the u.s. attorney for the state of minnesota. same thing is true at the end of the bush administration. at this time, the atf's interim acting director was also a commuter. he also had another job as a u.s. attorney in boston. and, you know, why bother having somebody do this job full time? it's like the way people who make keys and people who repair shoes sometimes share a storefront. each one is like half a business. cobbler, key cutter, and ensuring the safe and legal operation of the multibillion gun market in the united states. you can just do that on tuesdays and thursdays, right? maybe you can do that online, check into flex-time. the fact that the gun lobby and the republicans will not allow anybody to be in charge of the agency that regulates firearms in this country is one of the ridiculous anomalies about this particular field of policy and governance that the president talked about at his press conference today. he got very specific about this today in a way that he has not done before. >> there is also
of how we keep guns out of places that they are not allowed to be in this country, the u.s. congress in 1988 passed something called the undetectable firearms act. it said basically, your gun has to be detectable in an x-ray scanner. it has to have the equivalent x-ray signature of 3.7 ounces of stainless steel, even if you take out the magazine and the stock and the grips. even with those parts taken off, the remaining guts of the gun need to have a substantial metal component. so they will be seen on an x-ray machine. because of that law, we do not have fully plastic guns. that law was first passed in 1988. it was not particularly controversial. the vote in the house on that was 413 to 4. and president ronald reagan signed it. and tyranny was not unleashed upon the land. it is not controversial now that it is illegal to manufacture or sell a gun in the united states that is built to evade detection by standard means. we don't have plastic guns. we banned plastic guns. the ban has been renewed several times since. it is up for renewal again next year. when it comes up for renewal ne
of washington and what the federal government says is illegal. >> absolutely. that's either a rogue u.s. attorney or it's a trial balloon from the obama administration. and i think more likely, it's a trial balloon. because obama himself has said, look, i'm the president, but i can't legalize marijuana, because congress has outlawed it. either way, it is a trial balloon in the sense that it's going to have a chilling effect on the evolution of the industry in washington. the governor of the state, the regulators, when they get together to hash out the structure of the market, they are conspiring to break federal law. they're committing a crime. >> right. so how is that going to play out? in both these states, you have, you know, basically the law says they're going to have legalized marijuana growth and distribution and regulate it. can any of that even take place, unless there is some resolution from the federal government about how they're going to treat it? >> i think the state's going to move forward and wait to hear. they can't expect any resolution before they move forward. they h
make up 13% of the u.s. population. by 2050, they are expected to be 20%. 20%. that means you'll need to spend a lot more on social security and medicare. meanwhile the development of new miracle treatments we hope will keep happening and that will push the cost even higher. the future turns out to be expensive. that's simply the reality of it. and opposing tax increases doesn't change that reality. there's nothing in grover norquist's pledge that stops the aging process. if there was, i would take it. so there's no way the tax receipts of the 1960s will support the demographics of america in the 2020s or the 2030s. anyone who says otherwise is not taking the reality seriously. joining us is a man who always takes reality seriously. chris hayes. >> religiously. >> religiously. so one thing i always think is true in our political discussions is we don't like to face up to big changes. we like to use them as evidence for why whatever policies we support need to happen. but particularly the aging of this society, i don't think we've come anywhere close to thinking about what that will me
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)